Then & Now: Lowell, Union City, Howe & New Castle, Indiana

Today, I continue the series on other cities across Indiana, with an eye on how each town was effected by the urban renewal era which featured mass demolition of old structures, the paving over of lots, and deep setback. In this batch we see a number of small towns where not much has changed. We also see the opposite: New Castle, Indiana razed large portions of their downtown, but did manage to retain their old court house. Perhaps lamenting the demolition of parts of the old square, the city recently constructed new buildings to replicate the look of the old horse and buggy buildings of yesteryear along Race Street. The new buildings are a good attempt at honoring the approach of new urbanist city planning, but (of course) nothing beats the real thing.

(CLICK ALL PHOTOS TO ENLARGE)

LOWELL, INDIANA

Commercial Avenue, Lowell, Indiana 1917
Lowell, Indiana today meets 1917. Lowell still has most of it's old buildings still standing. And the roads are even paved!

Lowell, Indiana today meets 1917. Lowell still has most of it’s old buildings still standing. And the roads are even paved!

UNION CITY, INDIANA 1916 AND TODAY

Columbia Street, Union City, Indiana 1916

Columbia Street, Union City, Indiana 1916

Structurally, Not much had changed along Columbia Street.

Structurally, Not much had changed along Columbia Street.

1916 Union City still fits perfectly into this modern photo looking down Columbia Street.

1916 Union City still fits perfectly into this modern photo looking down Columbia Street.

HOWE (FORMERLY LIMA), INDIANA

Howe was settled in 1834. At that time, it was named Mongoquinong, a name that the Potawatomi Indians had given to the prairie in northeastern Indiana. Shortly thereafter it was renamed Lima and was, at that time, the county seat. It was later renamed Howe after John B. Howe, a local banker. The Howe Military School, the town's most famous attraction, was founded in 1884.

Howe was settled in 1834. At that time, it was named Mongoquinong, a name that the Potawatomi Indians had given to the prairie in northeastern Indiana. Shortly thereafter it was renamed Lima and was, at that time, the county seat. It was later renamed Howe after John B. Howe, a local banker.
The Howe Military School, the town’s most famous attraction, was founded in 1884.

3rd Street, Howe, Indiana next to 1905.

3rd Street, Howe, Indiana next to 1905.

The layout for Lima, Indiana in 1876.

The layout for Lima, Indiana in 1876.

NEW CASTLE, INDIANA

A 1906 view of the Bundy Hotel located on Race Street in New Castle, Indiana. All of these structures are now gone. More recently, the city decided to try to recreate this old classic block that was demolished during the urban renewal era.

A 1906 view of the Bundy Hotel located on Race Street in New Castle, Indiana. All of these structures are now gone. More recently, the city decided to try to recreate this old classic block that was demolished during the urban renewal era.

Today, the side of the Race Street where Bundy Hotel used to sit is occupied by new structures that attempt to recreate the compact urbanism of yesteryear. It's a nice attempt, but nothing beats the real thing.

Today, the side of the Race Street where Bundy Hotel used to sit is occupied by new structures that attempt to recreate the compact urbanism of yesteryear. It’s a nice attempt, but nothing beats the real thing.

Broad Street, East of Main Street, circa 1900 in Newcastle, IN

Broad Street, East of Main Street, circa 1900 in Newcastle, IN. Very little of this side of the block is left today.

This graphic shows what is left of this chunk of downtown New Castle.

This graphic shows what is left of this chunk of downtown New Castle.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: